Submarine cable free world map
Submarine cable free world map

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Submarine cable free world map

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Submarine cable free world map

Submarine cable - free world map

Submarine cable free world map

For anyone who may be interested, this is a truly 'great' resource - hats off to Greg !

Submarine cable - free world map
First published 23-07-2011
Have you ever wondered what happens when you click "Send" or, "Download" ? Most of us know where those bits of data are going to or, coming from, but what I mean is, how do they get there ?
For the purposes of this article, a hop is defined as being a place where the data passes through a device that has it's own IP address.
For outbound data ("Send"), the starting point of the journey is our computer, the first hop is likely to be to our modem or, wireless router, and from there the next hop is to the antenna on your roof (for wireless internet users). The third hop is to your internet service provider's wireless base station and then after that, the data could make any number of hops as it travels to its destination.
With the exception of the antenna on the roof and the wireless base station hops, the data from users of wired internet connections (ADSL, Cable etc.), follows a similar route as it travels to its destination.
Needless to say, the amount of hops in the journey is determined by the distance being travelled so, for example, if you are sending an email to a friend who, lives locally, uses the same internet service provider as you and shares the same email domain (eg: @whateverdomain.com), the journey may be relatively short and end at your Internet Service Provider's email server.
Alternatively, if you are sending an email to a relative who lives in Australia, the distance of the journey is far greater and therefore, the data, as it travels to its final destination, may make many more hops although, not necessarily.
At this point, I am going to stop because tracking the data as it hops along the local, regional and national network is not very interesting, but what our readers may be very interested to find out is, what happens to the data that is destined for another Country and how are the Countries connected together ?
Well, adjacent Countries on the same land mass are normally connected together using fiber cables. Countries separated by stretches of water are normally connected using submarine cables and this is where tracking the route that our data may take becomes more interesting.
Prior to Durban-based software developer Greg Mahlknecht building a free map showing the world's submarine telecommunications cable systems, there was only one other alternative, the $250 Dollar map that was being offered for sale at www.telegeography.com. Greg searched the internet looking for a free alternative to download, but couldn't find one and so, he decided to build his own 'free' version for everyone.
If the information on this page is useful, you can recommend it to other people using this Google +1 button. Thank you !
When you visit Greg's website - www.cablemap.info you are presented with Greg's cable map superimposed over the top of the Google Maps service. You are able to zoom in on the map to any part of the globe and look how your Country is connected to the rest of the international internet back-bone. The submarine cables are different thicknesses and are colour coded to denote their total throughput capacity in Gbps or, Tbps.
Holding your mouse over one of the cables changes the information display at the bottom of the screen which tells you the name of the cable, how many landings it has, the total length of the cable in Kilometres and the cable's total throughput capacity.
Once you have discovered the name of a cable that may be of interest to you, you can retrieve more information by clicking on its name in the menu to the right hand side of the screen.
For anyone who may be interested, this is a truly 'great' resource - hats off to Greg !
Submarine cable free world map
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